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Relive Old West Gunplay and Period Dress, with Your Own Cowboy Alias

Making Your Own Cowboy Action Shooting Alias

How to Create a Unique Cowboy Action Shooting Alias or Character Name

 

 

 

 

 

cowboy action shooting aliasHave you come up with your very own Cowboy Action Shooting alias? One of the most fun things about Cow­boy Action Shoot­ing is that it allows its mem­bers to assume the char­ac­ter of an Old West per­son­al­ity, and even choose an appro­pri­ate alias. It comes as no sur­prise to hear attention-getting names like Fire­wa­ter McGrath, Kat­rina Tum­ble­weed or Straight­shootin’ Sam Bart­tle­son. It’s like play­ing a grownup ver­sion of Cow­boys and Indi­ans, except that every­thing is real, from the Stet­son hat down to the snake­skin boots.

The Sin­gle Action Shoot­ing Soci­ety requires all mem­bers of affil­i­ated Cow­boy Action Shoot­ing orga­ni­za­tions to pick an alias that rep­re­sents a char­ac­ter or pro­fes­sion from the wild days of the Old West or a clas­sic west­ern film. The alias should be unique and not dupli­cate any other member’s alias. The SASS gen­er­ally has the final author­ity whether an alias can be used or not.

You can use any alias you desire, as long as it’s not morally or legally objec­tion­able and no one else is using it.

Choos­ing unique, strik­ing, mem­o­rable, or sim­ply funny alias is an inter­est­ing activ­ity all new mem­bers must go through. While com­ing up with a great-sounding alias is sec­ond nature to some peo­ple, it could be a real chal­lenge to some. Some will come up with a fan­tas­tic name only to find, to their dis­ap­point­ment, that another mem­ber has already beat them to it.

Meth­ods of Gen­er­at­ing a Cow­boy Action Shoot­ing Alias

There are sev­eral ways to come up with a Cow­boy Action Shoot­ing alias. Look at your character’s pro­fes­sion. If your char­ac­ter is in the med­ical pro­fes­sion, Doc or Saw­bones is a good place to start. Your character’s gen­eral dis­po­si­tion, such as Speedy, Grumpy, Smi­ley, Lefty or Cool are exam­ples of name mod­i­fiers you can use.

Phys­i­cal fea­tures are another point of ref­er­ence, such as Tubs, String­beans, Four-Fingered, or One-Eyed. While names dur­ing the time of the Old West weren’t always polit­i­cally cor­rect, the name you choose shouldn’t be offen­sive or obscene by any means.

Some mem­bers make a play on Span­ish terms and turn them into an alias. “Que bonita!” (How pretty!) can become Kay Bonita. Many mem­bers would like to be nick­named “El Guapo” or “El Guapa”. You can open a lot of pos­si­bil­i­ties if you look up Span­ish phrases.

Sev­eral decades ago, a clever way of select­ing a Cowboy Action Shooting alias was using the “two towns” method, adopt­ing a name which involved the names of two state towns. Erst­while singer Mar­ion Slaugh­ter was able to make many records by chang­ing his name to Ver­non Dal­hart, a com­bi­na­tion of two Texas towns, Ver­non and Dal­hart. Con­way Twitty derived his name from two towns in Arkansas.

Josephine Sweet­wa­ter, Tom Bean Wood­creek, and Honey Grove Hitch­cock are exam­ples of names cre­ated from com­bin­ing two Texas towns. The pos­si­bil­i­ties are end­less. Try doing the same with the name of your home state and you can come up with a num­ber of orig­i­nal and mem­o­rable Cow­boy Action Shoot­ing aliases that are less likely used by some­one else.

The phys­i­cal char­ac­ter­is­tic + name is a favorite way of com­ing up with a unique alias, such as Big Jim, Curly Bill, and Hand­some Bob. You can also use the “dou­ble first name” method, as in the case of James Alfred “J.A.” McFaddin and John Wes­ley Hardin. And, of course, there’s the city (or state) + nick­name + last name for­mula, like Texas Jack Ver­mil­lion and Arkansas Tom Jones. The names you can cre­ate are only lim­ited by your imagination.

Don’t For­get to Reg­is­ter Your Cowboy Action Shooting Alias – It’s Easy

Mem­ber­ship in any SASS-affiliated shoot­ing sports orga­ni­za­tion requires the reg­is­tra­tion of a unique Cowboy Action Shooting alias under which you com­pete in events. The SASS Shoot­ers Hand­book doesn’t allow the use of an alias that dupli­cates or can be con­fused with another reg­is­tered member’s alias.

The SASS strongly rec­om­mends the use of an alias spe­cially when par­tic­i­pat­ing in shoot­ing com­pe­ti­tions, as it adds to the fun and spirit of Cow­boy Action Shoot­ing. Your alias, once reg­is­tered, is yours alone as long as you stay a mem­ber. Remem­ber that if an alias sounds the same as another, it is basi­cally the same; a play on its spelling won’t make it any dif­fer­ent. Like­wise, aliases that don’t fit your char­ac­ter or sounds vul­gar won’t be allowed.

Here’s a use­ful tip. When you’re ready to join an SASS shoot­ing sport orga­ni­za­tion and want to reg­is­ter your alias, you can eas­ily do it over the phone. They can check up for any name dupli­ca­tion, and you can have your mem­ber­ship num­ber and alias while you’re still on the phone!

Choos­ing your own unique alias can be a chal­leng­ing yet enjoy­able activ­ity. It gives you an oppor­tu­nity to be who­ever you want to be within rea­son. Your cow­boy attire can be tai­lored around your cho­sen char­ac­ter and name, which only adds to the fun of this shoot­ing sport. Choose your Cow­boy Action Shoot­ing alias wisely and don’t for­get to reg­is­ter it with the SASS.

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